Time Limit: 3000 MS    Memory Limit: 65536 K 


Description

One day, Bessie was gazing off into the distance at the beautiful Wisconsin mountains when she wondered to herself: which mountain is the widest one? She decided to take N (1 <= N <= 100,000) equally-spaced height measurements H_i (1 <= H_i <= 1,000,000,000) sequentially along the horizon using her new Acme Long Distance Geoaltimeter. A mountain is defined to be a consecutive sequence of H_i values which increases (or stays the same) and then decreases (or stays the same), e.g., 2, 3, 3, 5, 4, 4, 1. It is possible for a mountain on the edge of her field of vision only to increase or only to decrease in height, as well. The width of a mountain is the number of measurements it encompasses. Help Bessie identify the widest mountain. Here's a simple example of a typical horizon: ******* * ********* *** ********** ***** *********** ********* * * ***************** *********** *** * ** ******************* ************* * * ******* * ********************************************************************** 3211112333677777776543332111112344456765432111212111112343232111111211 aaaaaa ccccccccccccccccccccc eeeeeee ggggggggg bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb ddddd ffffffffff hhhhhhhhh The mountains are marked 'a', 'b', etc. Obviously, mountain b is widest with width 28. The mountain on the left has width 6 for the purposes of this task.

Input

* Line 1: A single integer: N * Lines 2..N+1: Line i+1 contains a single integer: H_i

Output

* Line 1: A single line with a single integer that is the width of the widest mountain.

Sample Input

7 3 2 3 5 4 1 6

Sample Output

5